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Once you're logged in, follow the straightforward prompts to connect each accessory. This was one of the easiest security system setups I've ever encountered; literally pull the battery tab on the battery-powered door/window sensor and motion sensor and plug in the base station, the keypad and the Z-Wave range extender, and they automatically connect to the app.
Expand Security With Other Devices	Nest Cam, Nest Protect, Nest Thermostat, Nest Secure, Nest Hello, Nest Cam IQ	Ring Stick Up, Solar Panel, Chime, Chime Pro, Ring Floodlight Cam, Ring Spotlight Cam, Ring Protect, Video Doorbell, Ring Beams	Canary, Canary View	Arlo Wire-Free, Arlo Q, Arlo Go, Arlo Baby, Arlo Pro 2, Arlo Security Light, Arlo Audio Doorbell (coming soon)

You can monitor the system yourself using the mobile app and web app, but that means you'll have to alert the police or fire department when there's a break-in or fire. Or, you can subscribe to the Ring Protect Plus monitoring plan. For $10 per month or $100 a year, you get 24/7 professional monitoring that includes police and fire department dispatch and push and email alerts. It also includes unlimited cloud recording for all Ring cameras, which makes it one of the best monitoring deals around.
All these new DIY systems pretty much rely on cellular and/or Wi-Fi. It seems that although it makes things more accessible, cheaper and easier to install, that’s where most of the glitches, or inconsistent alarm notifications come from, right? But in general it’s good that these systems have been made available for us all to choose from. Thank you for helping us navigate all the choices.
The second issue I have for the system is that there is no quick exit feature. For the entire six years that I've had a security system, I have been used to being able to press a button that will give me one minute to quietly exit the house. This is important when I am leaving for work a few hours before my family wakes up for their day. The Ring system doesn't have this feature at all. When the system is armed, it has to be disarmed (which it announces) and rearmed before exiting with a delay that can be set up with your phone (it will announce this as well and will make a sound while it counts down) or can be armed from your phone after you leave (again, it will announce this with the countdown sound). You either have to chose if you want the system to count down or not. Not counting down will immediately arm it and you will have to arm from your phone if you leave and arm it on the "Home" setting while others are still there. You can adjust the sound that is emitted from the panel so that it isn't loud, but it will also make your door and window chimes use the same volume all of the time. If you have your system armed while you’re home, and the volume is down, you might not hear the system telling you that it needs to be disarmed if you forget and open a door. There is no in-between here. If you have to leave while others are still sleeping, this may be a problem for you.
3. Both Arlo and Nest have a lag from time to time. There are moments when I pull out my phone to stream Nest and it just spins and spins. I have to hard close it and then reopen the app. When it’s working, I can usually access footage in about 4 seconds. Arlo takes about 8 seconds to wake. There is also a 4 second difference between what you see on your phone and what’s happening in real life. WiFi will really depend on the speed and quality of your internet connection at home. I would suggest performing a quick test to see your current upload/download speeds.
There is a problem with the Alexa skill if it requires the user to say “(whispers) Alexa, show me the front door” when someone is at the front door. As is, without Alexa – people already try to hide, turn the lights off, etc. – lol. “ALEXA!!! SHOW ME WHO IS AT THE FRONT DOOR. OH THAT PERSON I DO NOT WANT TO OPEN IT, I DO NOT LIKE THAT PERSON THEY ARE NOT HOLDING PIZZA! SO I WILL NOT OPEN IT. I HOPE THEY DID NOT HEAR ME.”

1. Correct. Geofencing is a free feature. I’m not sure what abode uses specifically, but generally, geofencing does require GPS or location services to be enabled. I know the system doesn’t use Bluetooth. My dad is using the system right now and he’s had problems with multi-user geofencing. I asked abode about it, but they just wanted to troubleshoot instead of discussing general performance. If I were to guess, I’d guess that it’s only using GPS to detect presence and not a combination of data like GPS and phone presence (Wifi).


If you have a dog or a cat, getting a home alarm that won’t be constantly triggered by Fido or Fifi’s movements is a real question you have to consider. The Ring Alarm claims that it won’t detect pets weighing under 50 pounds if the alarm is mounted above seven feet, while pet-friendly motion detection is already integrated into the Nest base station and door sensors.
The door/window sensors (also called contact sensors) work pretty well, but the same cannot be said about the motion sensors; they will detect motion after there’s been plenty of movement (if I walk the hallway and enter a room it will not detect, but if I sit for a few seconds moving in the hallway it will detect it then). This is still not a show stopper for me, as I have a dog and don’t plan on buying any more motion sensors, it will be all contact sensors.
After shipping later than expected, is the Ring Alarm still worth your time? There are a bunch of alarm systems available that you can buy and install yourself these days, but there are a few key points that make the Ring Alarm stand out. From the ease of installation to the low monthly costs, the Ring Alarm system ticks a lot of boxes on paper that people will be looking for, but how does that on-paper experience compare to the real-life one?

Although this looks intriguing, my experience with Ring products is that they work about 75% of the time on our two cameras. And the problems are definitely with Ring, not our network - as sometimes our iPhone / iPad won't connect, but an Android device right next to it on the same network will connect just fine to the video. Occasionally it is the other way around, but sometimes nothing will connect to the Ring camera even though my home network is up and working fine. That's annoying for video alerts... but for a home alarm, I don't think I would trust them based on my experience with our Ring cameras.

Ring also doesn't currently offer any additional security accessories, but it plans to add a leak sensor and other devices at some point. And while your Ring security cameras and video doorbells ($250 at Amazon) live in the same app as your Ring Alarm Security Kit, there aren't any direct integrations between them today. I'd like to see something like, "If the Ring Alarm Security Kit's front door sensor notices that the door is opened in Home or Away mode, then tell my Ring Video Doorbell Pro to record automatically" -- even if the Video Doorbell Pro itself hasn't detected motion yet. 
Speaking of monitoring, there are different modes that you can set when arming the alarm. When you're at home, there are two choices, including Disarmed and Home. With disarmed, there is no 3rd-party monitoring happening, so you can open and close the doors, windows, and more as you please. Home mode is used for times like when you're home alone or going to bed, and there is external monitoring involved. With Home mode, you can opt to change which sensors are active and which aren't, which is great for if you don't want a motion sensor to go off because of your pets or something.

Think of Smart Alerts as the ability to control alert frequency. You can request to receive more alerts, “standard,” or “light” (fewer alerts) or choose to turn notifications off from the app’s main screen. You can also snooze motion alerts for a set period of time. Once snoozed, you won’t receive motion alerts, but motion events will continue to upload to the cloud. Besides snoozing motion, you can also snooze your Ring Chime or your Chime Pro.
Wow, thanks for putting such a great article together. I knew about Ring – for some reason their marketing got to me, and started to consider, which lead me to this article. But, after reading this I might have to revisit purchasing it. Looks like some people are thinking Nest after reading it, but it’s leaning me toward Adobe. Thanks again for all the details!
The Ring Floodlight Cam gives you the maximum amount of illumination when activity is detected. You can purchase this device at $249 for 1, $448 for 2, $649 for 3 and $849 for 4. The two LED floodlights make it impossible for someone to sneak around without getting a clear view of them. The Floodlight Cam uses two sensors for detecting people and objects, with an ultra-wide angle field. You can zoom and pan with the camera for a closer look if you’re not sure what you’re seeing.
I’ve enjoyed reading your summaries for over a year. I initially had my mind set on Abode after removing iSmartAlarm and SimpliSafe (previous generation) from consideration. I had an Abode package all set and nearly pulled the trigger on a purchase. However, after coming across Ring and reading your review multiple times, I ultimately went with Ring. What won me over was the package being offered by Costco that has six door/window sensors. When I priced out what Abode would cost to have comparable coverage, Ring clearly won out. I don’t need any integrations or automation, thus I don’t feel I’m losing out on those aspects by selecting Ring over Abode.

As far as Ring Alarm, I don’t have an answer for you, but I understand and appreciate the knowledge you’ve shared. I would also agree that if they haven’t advertised jamming detection, that’s probably because it doesn’t exist. A Twitter friend of mine, who works for Underwriters Laboratories (UL), also mentioned that the system is not UL certified. Again, probably not as important to you as this jamming issue, but something interesting to note.
If the security device isn’t try to prevent jamming at all (And the protocol is one way – from sensor to main hub), all the thief need is a 10$-30$ device (definitely not close $1,000) which actively send signals and prevent the good signal to pass (the cheap signal jammer can be adjusted to frequency like you turn on a radio. the frequency itself is probably common in all devices or can be found on device manual) [not putting a security sign is https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Security_through_obscurity but it may be better than nothing].
This one is for anyone who lives in a medium to large size house. The Ring Chime Pro boosts the Wi-Fi signal from your router so that even your most remote Ring devices are supported. This also amplifies any notifications they send. Most users have found that this significantly improves the strength of their doorbells, which makes sense as the front door is often far away from your living room or office. Possibly the simplest item to install on this list, simply plug the Ring Chime Pro into a wall outlet and you’re good to go.
Put whole-home security in your hands with Ring Alarm. When the system is armed, it sends instant alerts to your phone and tablet whenever doors or windows are opened and when motion is detected at home, so you can monitor your property from anywhere.  Ring Alarm is fully customizable and expands to fit any home or apartment. And with Ring Video Doorbells and Security Cameras, it lets you control your entire home security system from one simple app.

The Spotlight Cam captures video at 1080p and has a 140-degree field of view, but lacks the pre-buffered recording capabilities that you get with Netgear's Arlo Pro 2 camera and the Ring Video Doorbell Pro. It uses four infrared LEDS to provide up to 30 feet of night vision and has a built-in 110dB siren, an 802.11n Wi-Fi radio, and a speaker and microphone for two-way audio. The spotlight itself consists of two strips on either side of the camera, each with four LEDs that provide an overall brightness of 700 lumens with a 4,000K color temperature. The camera comes with one battery pack, a mounting bracket, wall screws and anchors, a screwdriver and drill bit, and a setup guide.
The biggest disadvantage to many IoT/smart systems is the lack of an API. They are closed source and in reality are designed to lock you in to their products and offerings. If you’re happy with only buying say Ring products for everything and areas that they don’t have an offering you can’t integrate other products in, then you stuck with only what they offer.
You can also pay $10 per month for professional monitoring, but that’s it. There are no integrated carbon monoxide or fire alarms, and it’s not capable of syncing up with other smart home devices. This means you can’t control your lights, thermostat, locks, etc. The company says these are coming as the system grows and improves, but for now they’ll be missing if you buy the Ring Security System.

Once you're logged in, follow the straightforward prompts to connect each accessory. This was one of the easiest security system setups I've ever encountered; literally pull the battery tab on the battery-powered door/window sensor and motion sensor and plug in the base station, the keypad and the Z-Wave range extender, and they automatically connect to the app.
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